vintage-katie:

"It says ‘in god we trust’ on our money. It says ‘in god we trust’ above the judges bench in a court room. In a court of law, where you have to put your hand on a bible, the christian bible. It’s not my bible. I mean, if I tell the truth it’s because I tell the truth. Not because I put my hand on a book and made a wish. That’s fucking crazy"  (x) 
Zoom Info
vintage-katie:

"It says ‘in god we trust’ on our money. It says ‘in god we trust’ above the judges bench in a court room. In a court of law, where you have to put your hand on a bible, the christian bible. It’s not my bible. I mean, if I tell the truth it’s because I tell the truth. Not because I put my hand on a book and made a wish. That’s fucking crazy"  (x) 
Zoom Info
vintage-katie:

"It says ‘in god we trust’ on our money. It says ‘in god we trust’ above the judges bench in a court room. In a court of law, where you have to put your hand on a bible, the christian bible. It’s not my bible. I mean, if I tell the truth it’s because I tell the truth. Not because I put my hand on a book and made a wish. That’s fucking crazy"  (x) 
Zoom Info
vintage-katie:

"It says ‘in god we trust’ on our money. It says ‘in god we trust’ above the judges bench in a court room. In a court of law, where you have to put your hand on a bible, the christian bible. It’s not my bible. I mean, if I tell the truth it’s because I tell the truth. Not because I put my hand on a book and made a wish. That’s fucking crazy"  (x) 
Zoom Info

vintage-katie:

"It says ‘in god we trust’ on our money. It says ‘in god we trust’ above the judges bench in a court room. In a court of law, where you have to put your hand on a bible, the christian bible. It’s not my bible. I mean, if I tell the truth it’s because I tell the truth. Not because I put my hand on a book and made a wish. That’s fucking crazy"  (x

jaclcfrost:

don’t underestimate me. i’ll wear sweaters in the summer. i’ll eat like eighteen gallons of ice cream in the winter. fuck the temperature. i don’t give a fuck

Do not look at yourself with disgust, you are a gift to this earth. You are beautiful, you are a light, an energy, an essence. You are nature herself.

Heidi Pickett (via cosmofilius)

nprglobalhealth:

Ebola In The Skies? How The Virus Made It To West Africa
The Ebola outbreak in West Africa is the most explosive in history. One reason the virus spread so fast is that West Africa was blindsided. Ebola had never erupted in people anywhere close to West Africa before.
The type of Ebola causing the outbreak — called Zaire — is the deadliest strain. Until this year, it had been seen only in Central Africa, about 2,500 miles away. That’s about the distance between Boston and San Francisco.
So how did it spread across this giant swath of land without anybody noticing?
To answer that, ecologist Peter Walsh says we need to look at the history of Ebola Zaire.
Back in the summer of 1976, a young Zairian doctor named Ngoy Mushola traveled to a rural village in what is today the Democratic Republic of the Congo.
He heard people were dying of a strange disease, near the shores of the Ebola River. They had fevers, stomachaches and rashes. Some had internal bleeding.
"What’s so nasty about it is that it effectively melts your blood vessels," says Walsh, who’s at the University of Cambridge.
Continue reading.
Illustration by Leif Parsons for NPR

nprglobalhealth:

Ebola In The Skies? How The Virus Made It To West Africa

The Ebola outbreak in West Africa is the most explosive in history. One reason the virus spread so fast is that West Africa was blindsided. Ebola had never erupted in people anywhere close to West Africa before.

The type of Ebola causing the outbreak — called Zaire — is the deadliest strain. Until this year, it had been seen only in Central Africa, about 2,500 miles away. That’s about the distance between Boston and San Francisco.

So how did it spread across this giant swath of land without anybody noticing?

To answer that, ecologist Peter Walsh says we need to look at the history of Ebola Zaire.

Back in the summer of 1976, a young Zairian doctor named Ngoy Mushola traveled to a rural village in what is today the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

He heard people were dying of a strange disease, near the shores of the Ebola River. They had fevers, stomachaches and rashes. Some had internal bleeding.

"What’s so nasty about it is that it effectively melts your blood vessels," says Walsh, who’s at the University of Cambridge.

Continue reading.

Illustration by Leif Parsons for NPR